November 2016 – Salty John : The Blog

Looking through the old recipe books built up over five or six years of liveaboard cruising I’ve spotted an old favourite: Maddie bread.

Maddie bread is a great treat for breakfast or as an anytime snack. We liked it in place of toast, which was a pain to make using those stupid wire racks over a cooker burner.

Maddie bread is short for Madeleine’s German Graham Bread: Our friend Madeleine introduced us to it, she claims it’s German in origin, Graham is a type of wholemeal flour and it’s a kind of bread. So, it’s an accurate if not succinct title.

By the way, don’t confuse Graham flour with gram flour; the latter is made from chickpeas, not wheat.

Anyway, on with the recipe:

1 cup of all purpose flour 2 cups of Graham flour. (Substitute wholemeal outside North America) 1 ½ tsp baking powder 1 tsp salt ½ cup brown sugar 2 cups of buttermilk. (A substitute for buttermilk is ordinary milk with 1 tablespoon of lemon juice or vinegar added per cup).

Cinnamon or raisins, optional.

Blend all dry ingredients in a mixing bowl. Add buttermilk – mix with spoon. Add cinnamon or raisins if desired. Turn into greased bread pan and bake for 1 hour at 180ºC (350ºF).

Delicious with butter and jam. Enjoy.

Oh, and here’s a tip for keeping your flour, rice, pasta and other dry staples weevil free – put a few bay leaves in the storage container. Put unopened bags or boxes of these products in large plastic bags with a few bay leaves. I don’t know why this works, but it does.

I’ve read somewhere that the most widely held dream in the western world is to set off in a small boat to sail around the world. It’s the lure of total freedom that does it, of course, and as dreams go it takes some beating – master of all you survey, no schedule, no boss, tropical beaches, gin clear water, fun in every port.

As you acquire more knowledge, however, reality draws closer and you have to address some of those inconvenient concerns that intrude – the ones that make you bash your pillow, turn over and try to recapture the dream as it was, unadulterated. Concerns like: How much money will we need? What if we get ill? What about storms? Will I get seasick? But then you tell yourself these are just speed bumps on the road to freedom. Many, many people have been this way before and they overcame all kinds of obstacles. You know for sure it’s possible and, of course, you’re right.

But I’d suggest that those who have actually sailed beyond the horizon are less likely to dream of a life on the ocean waves than those who have barely set foot on the deck of a boat. A rough three day offshore passage during which you’re debilitated by seasickness can’t intrude unless you’ve experienced it. Running aground, dragging anchor, the constant motion and having a clogged heads won’t disturb the dream because they’re concepts beyond your ken. Ignorance is, indeed, bliss and a little knowledge is dangerous.

I sailed in an offshore race with a very experienced man and wife team and two days out the wife stood in the saloon and screamed at the top of her voice “Get me off this fucking boat!” Then she went on deck and stood her watch. And then I’ve listened to people who have done no more than coastal hop from marina to marina expound their plans to set off around the globe.

Far be it from me to discourage anyone from seeking adventure in a small boat, I’ve done it twice, but beware the little devil who whispers in your ear, “set off now, before you’ve learnt enough to know this isn’t the life for you.”

OK, so you have a superb radio and a top class antenna. What do you use to connect one to the other without losing the potential of these fine pieces of kit? Coaxial cable is the answer, but not all coax was created equal.

Coaxial cable for VHF radio and AIS is 50 ohm – your TV cable is 75 ohm so you can’t just use some coax left over from your satellite dish installation.

Furthermore, marine cable needs to work in a hostile and constantly moving environment so conductor and braid need to be tinned copper to resist corrosion and the conductor needs to be stranded so it can bend without breaking. A good PVC jacket will keep sunlight degradation at bay.

But what size cable should you choose?

You should aim at a transmission loss of no more than 50% in the run from radio or AIS engine to antenna. In fact, the requirement of the ISAAF for offshore racing is no more than 40% loss in the radio antenna cable.

A loss of 3 decibels (dB) halves the signal so you’ll want to restrict the line loss to no more than that. Signal loss in the cable, known as attenuation, is determined by the size and construction of the conductor, the quality of the shielding and the operating frequency.

Good quality RG213 will lose about 33% of the signal strength in a 20m run, about 45% in a 30m run, so for very big boats it’s the way to go. However, RG213 (and its slightly lower spec but similarly stiff cousin, RG8U) is nominally 10 mm diameter, nearly half an inch in old money, so it’s heavy and doesn’t like to go around tight corners. It’s difficult to work with.

RG8X is nominally 7mm diameter, although actually about 6.5mm diameter unless it has a particularly thick outer jacket. This cable is much lighter and easier to work with than 10mm cable. Good quality RG8X will lose a little less than 50% in a 20m run.

You may also see RG58 cable, it sometimes comes with cheap aerials. It is nominally a 6mm cable, but usually closer to 5mm diameter, and is very lossy. OK for very short runs, perhaps, but certainly not for masthead installations. It loses a whopping 65% of the signal in a 20m run. That means 15 watts of your 25 watts maximum power is lost just in the cable run. It’s scandalous that this cable is offered in ever increasing lengths, factory crimped to an aerial. It used to be offered in 5m lengths for power boats but just recently I’ve seen it offered in 25m lengths. Don’t use it for anything more than 6m runs or you’ll lose more than half your signal power.

So, make sure your cable is of marine quality with good shielding and for a cable run of up to about 20m use RG8X, for much longer runs you’ll need to wrestle with RG213/ RG8U. Don’t use RG58 except for very short runs, up to 6m.

And remember: “A penny in the antenna system is worth a pound in the radio”, so don’t skimp on your antenna, cable and connectors if you want to unlock the full potential of your radio or AIS unit.